Small Worlds Tokyo: A Miniature Journey Through Japan’s Wonders

Tokyo is famous for being the largest city in the world, but did you know it is also home to one of the world’s largest indoor miniature museums? Small Worlds Tokyo allows visitors to enter a world where bustling Tokyo streets, iconic landmarks, famous anime cities, lifelike airports and futuristic landscapes fit right at your fingertips.

Small Worlds Tokyo is 7000 square metres of miniature dioramas based on real-life and fictional locations across eight thematic areas. These dioramas are so realistic you will study them for the finest details. There is also cutting-edge technology used throughout, to change areas from day to night, allowing you to watch rockets and planes take off. 

If you fall in love with Small Worlds Tokyo, you can choose to stay there for an entire year. But as a tiny resident. Visitors can create a 1:80 scale model of themselves using a 3D scanner, which can be placed within one of the displays and stay there for one year. 

My visit to Small Worlds Tokyo was my first time visiting a miniature museum, and I had no idea what to expect. But I soon felt like a child, staring in awe at various intricate displays and worlds coming to life. 

In this article, I will touch on the positives and negatives, provide a general guide, and add some personal thoughts about the experience. I will then state whether it’s worth adding Small Worlds to your Tokyo itinerary.

Disclaimer:  This article contains affiliate links.  If you book after clicking on one of these links then we may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Small Worlds Tokyo
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Introduction to Small Worlds Tokyo

Now that you know that Small Worlds Tokyo is one of the biggest miniature museums in the world, you might be asking yourself, what exactly is a miniature museum?

A replica of Shin-Goura Station
A replica of Shin-Goura Station

Brief History of Small Worlds Tokyo

Small Worlds Tokyo opened in Odaiba, Tokyo, on the 11th of June 2020 after the state of emergency was lifted during the pandemic. Created by a team of dedicated artists, they focused on the smallest details and created a world with everything being 1/80th the size of real life. The level of craftsmanship throughout Small Worlds is incredibly high and elaborate.

This miniature museum was created with a straightforward idea in mind. Many Japanese people have a passion for small, cute things. This passion is also evident across much of the whole world. Scientific evidence suggests that looking at tiny, cute things gives people the urge to protect something they view as vulnerable. 

Smalls Worlds Tokyo quickly became a hit, and it was extremely popular with Japanese visitors, school trips, and anime fans during the pandemic. But when Japan finally opened to tourists in October 2022, it also became well-received by foreign visitors and received many rave reviews online. 

Overview of Small Worlds Tokyo

Small Worlds Tokyo is the largest indoor miniature museum in Japan and one of the largest in the world. This museum has eight different areas featured on two floors.

  • The Space Center area lets visitors experience a future space station while reliving the 1960s and the Apollo missions. 
  • The Global Village features miniatures of five Asian and European countries across various periods.
  • There is a realistic Kansai International Airport, which also features runways and a departure lounge. 
  • Nightlife in Japan is an area that focuses on various night views of different regions of Japan.
  • For anime fans, there are two Sailor Moon sections. The Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon area contains a recreation of the city Azabu Juban from the anime. Crystal Tokyo is a model of 30th-century Tokyo made of shining crystals and light effects. 
  • There are also two Evangelion areas. At Evangelion Tokyo III, there is a miniature replica of the city from Evangelion, which transforms for protection. And finally, there is the Evangelion Hanger. This area has replica Evangelion Units and the launch site.

Each area is incredibly detailed, with buildings, people and animals, moving vehicles, and even tiny plants. You have to look very closely for details such as some of the building’s interiors or even famous characters or movie scene replicas. 

Small Worlds Tokyo also makes excellent use of technology. There are many interactive features across all areas. With the push of a button, you could make a train come out of a tunnel or have someone fighting with a horse. They also use time with projection screens changing from day to night, and simultaneously, the miniature city lights start to turn on. 

For photographers, there are some areas to get creative where you can enter the middle of a diorama and take photos up close to the models. There are also some areas marked out for the best photo spots.

One of the most unique souvenirs can be yours at Small Worlds with their 3D figure studio. Visitors can have a body scan and create their own miniature figure based on themself. You can either take these home or pay to have them placed in one of the various areas. 

Small Worlds Tokyo also runs various special events throughout the year, such as Go! Wheel Day twice a month, specifically for wheelchair users. There are also set days when people are allowed to bring pets.

A Cathay Pacific airplane on the runway at Kansai International Airport.
A Cathay Pacific aeroplane on the runway at Kansai International Airport.

Who Will Enjoy Small Worlds Tokyo the Most

Small Worlds Tokyo is a great day out and a unique experience, but some visitors might enjoy it more than others. The types of people that will enjoy Small Worlds the most include:

  • Families with Children: Small Worlds is suitable for family visitors looking for engaging indoor entertainment for children and adults.
  • Photography Enthusiasts: It can be a visual highlight in their travel portfolios, offering something different from traditional tourist spots. If you have a zoom lens, you can capture some excellent photographs.
  • Hobbyists and Collectors: Visitors who have a passion for model trains, dioramas, or miniature landscapes would find Small Worlds Tokyo a must-visit due to the unparalleled craftsmanship and detail of the exhibits.
  • Fans of Japanese Pop Culture and Sci-Fi: People with a connection to pop culture/anime (Evangelion and Sailor Moon) will greatly enjoy Small Worlds. Some dioramas are dedicated to futuristic and fantastical themes.
  • People who admire tech and innovation: Interesting technology is used and offers a futuristic aspect of cultural exploration.
  • Culture and Art Enthusiasts: Small Worlds provides insight into Japanese attention to detail and creativity.
  • General Tourists and Travellers: Small Worlds Tokyo offers a unique blend of traditional Japanese scenes and global landscapes in miniature form.
  • Repeat Visitors to Tokyo: For tourists who’ve already seen Tokyo’s primary attractions on previous visits and are looking for something different, Small Worlds Tokyo offers a unique experience.
Visitors admiring the Global Village.
Visitors are admiring the Global Village.

Who Might Find Small Worlds Less Appealing

Small Worlds Tokyo might not be everyone’s cup of tea. Some visitors might not enjoy the experience as much, including: 

  • Seekers of Thrills and Adventure: Those looking for high-adrenaline attractions or physical activities might find the contemplative nature of viewing miniatures less exciting.
  • Tourists with Limited Time: Visitors on a tight schedule wanting to see Tokyo’s more iconic and historical landmarks might prioritise other destinations over a miniature park.
  • Those Seeking Traditional Japanese Culture: While Small Worlds does showcase scenes from Japan, it’s not a deep dive into traditional Japanese culture or history. Tourists seeking a purely cultural or historical experience might prioritise other attractions.
  • People with Limited Patience for Details: The joy of Small Worlds Tokyo is in the intricate details. Those who prefer broad strokes or quick overviews might find the park less engaging.
  • Tourists Seeking Outdoor Experiences: Those wanting to immerse themselves in Japan’s natural landscapes or outdoor urban experiences might find an indoor miniature park less aligned with what they want.
The dioramas at Small Worlds Tokyo are incredibly realistic.
The dioramas at Small Worlds Tokyo are incredibly realistic.

When to Visit Small Worlds Tokyo

Small Worlds Tokyo is a great attraction to visit all year round. However, there are some times when the experience will be more enjoyable than others.

Small Worlds is an entirely indoor miniature museum, which makes it perfect to visit during the hot Japanese summer. Enjoy air conditioning and stroll around Small Worlds Tokyo while taking a break from the sun. Small Worlds Tokyo is also perfect on a wet day as you can keep dry and do a fun indoor activity.

As Tokyo is a massively populated city, Small Worlds Tokyo can become busy during specific periods. The quietest times to visit are on weekdays in the morning. Small Worlds Tokyo gets busier from 1 pm onwards. 

It will also be busy during weekends, so if you have to visit, then it would be best to go for its opening at 9 am before the rush starts. Before planning your visit, check there is not a school or public holiday that day, as it will be busier than usual.

One of the futuristic Space Centre dioramas with the rockets in the background.
One of the futuristic Space Centre dioramas with the rockets in the background.

How to Buy Small Worlds Tokyo Tickets

Before planning your trip to Small Worlds, you might wonder how to buy tickets and if they can be purchased in advance. 

Small Worlds Tokyo Ticket Options

There are various options available when buying Small Worlds Tokyo tickets:

  • There is the standard entry ticket. 
  • There is a deal with an entry ticket and a 1-day ticket for the Yurikamome train line. 
  • For people with disabilities, there is a reduced ticket price. 
  • There are different prices for adults, youth (12-17) and children (4-11). 
  • Children aged three and under receive free entry.
  • A 3D Figure Resident Plan includes your 3D scan, and your model will be placed in one of the areas for one year.
  • For people who really love Small Worlds Tokyo, there is an Annual passport ticket allowing visitors unlimited access to Small Worlds for a full year. 
A standard entry ticket to Small Worlds Tokyo.
A standard entry ticket to Small Worlds Tokyo.

Where to Buy Small Worlds Tokyo Tickets

One of the quickest and most convenient ways to buy Small Worlds Tokyo tickets is through your preferred online travel agency such as Klook, KKDay, Rakuten Travel Experiences or Get Your Guide. With each of these options, you can pick your day, purchase your ticket, and pay immediately. This is also the most straightforward way for international visitors to buy tickets.

An alternative option to purchase your ticket is to purchase a Klook Tokyo Pass, to get great discounts by packaging your entry tickets for Tokyo.

Ticket prices are as follows.

Entry Ticket:

  • Adult: 2,700 Yen (US$ 17.90)
  • Youth: (12-17): 1,900 Yen (US$ 12.60)
  • Child: (4-11): 1,500 Yen (US$ 9.90)

Entry Ticket + Yurikamome 1-day ticket: (The Yurikamome Line One-Day Pass is a special ticket for one day of unlimited travel on the waterfront line connecting Shimbashi, Toyosu, Odaiba, and Ariake in Tokyo)

  • Adult: 2,950 Yen (US$ 19.50)
  • Youth: (12-17): 2,370 Yen (US$ 15.70)
  • Child: (6-11): 1,620 Yen (US$ 10.70)

Tickets can also be purchased from the official Small Worlds Tokyo website. Some tickets can be purchased in advance, and some must be purchased at the ticket office. The Small Worlds website has some extra ticket options. 

Small World website ticket prices are as follows.

Entry Ticket:

  • Adult: 2,700 Yen (US$ 17.90)
  • Youth: (12-17): 1,900 Yen (US$ 12.60)
  • Child: (4-11): 1,500 Yen (US$ 9.90)

Entry Ticket + Yurikamome 1-day ticket: (The Yurikamome Line One-Day Pass is a special ticket for one day of unlimited travel on the waterfront line connecting Shimbashi, Toyosu, Odaiba, and Ariake in Tokyo)

  • Adult: 2,950 Yen (US$ 19.50)
  • Youth: (12-17): 2,370 Yen (US$ 15.70)
  • Child: (6-11): 1,620 Yen (US$ 10.70)

Entrance ticket (guests with disabilities/welfare certificates/beneficiary certificates):

  • Adult: 2,000 Yen (US$ 13.20)
  • Youth: (12-17): 1,500 Yen (US$ 9.90)
  • Child: (6-11): 1,200 Yen (US$ 7.90)

Note: This ticket must be purchased at the ticket counter on the day of your visit. You will have to present a disability/welfare/beneficiary certificate.

Annual Passport ticket (One Year Unlimited Entrance):

  • Adult: 9,800 Yen (US$ 64.70)
  • Youth: (12-17): 7,600 Yen (US$ 50.20)
  • Child: (6-11): 5,900 Yen (US$ 39.00)

Annual Passport ticket (One Year Unlimited Entrance)(Discount for residents of Koto Ward):

  • Adult: 8,330 Yen (US$ 55.00)
  • Youth: (12-17): 6,460 Yen (US$ 42.60)
  • Child: (6-11): 5,015 Yen (US$ 33.10)

Note: Annual tickets must be purchased at the ticket counter on the 1st floor on the day of your visit.

3D Figure Resident Plan (1/80 Scale Body Scan Figure and One Year Residency):

There are several different options for the 3D figure resident plan.

Evangelion With Annual Pass:

Adult: 19,800 Yen (US$ 130.70). Teens and Under: 17,600 Yen (US$ 116.20)

Evangelion Without Annual Pass:

Adult/Teens and Under: 9,800 Yen (US$ 64.70)

Space Center/Global Village/Kansai International Airport With Annual Pass:

Adult: 12,630 Yen (US$ 83.40). Teens and Under: 10,760 Yen (US$ 71.00)

Space Center/Global Village/Kansai International Airport Without Annual Pass:

Adult/Teen and Under: 4,800 Yen (US$ 31.70)

Couples Ticket – Space Center/Global Village/Kansai International Airport Without Annual Pass:

Set Price for 2 People: 7,000 Yen (US$ 46.20)

Note: Figure resident tickets must be purchased at the ticket counter on the 1st floor on the day of your visit.

Small Worlds Tokyo Hours of Operation

Small World Tokyo is open seven days a week. The opening hours are Monday to Sunday from 9 am to 7 pm, with the last entry at 6 pm.

Hours are subject to change without prior notice. Please check the official website calendar for any closures or hour changes due to public holidays: 

The entrance to Small Worlds Tokyo is a great photo op.
The entrance to Small Worlds Tokyo is a great photo op.

Getting to Small Worlds Tokyo

Small Worlds Tokyo is located in the Ariake district of Odaiba, Tokyo. There are various ways to travel there, with some being more fun and scenic than others. 

Small Worlds Tokyo, Ariake Butsuryu Center: 1-3-33, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135-0063

Access by Train

Small Worlds Tokyo can be accessed using the Yurikamome Line. Ride until Ariake Tennis no Mori station; from there, it is a three-minute walk. 

The Yurikamome Line is a driverless train and offers stunning views from the first car.

Another option is to use the Rinkai Line and ride until Kokusai-Tenjijo station; from there, it is a nine-minute walk.

Smalls Worlds Tokyo is a 3-minute walk from Ariake Tennis no Mori station.
Smalls Worlds Tokyo is a 3-minute walk from Ariake Tennis no Mori station.

Access by Bus

There are a few different bus options to get to Small Worlds Tokyo. The Toei Bus East 16/TO05-2 will take you to Ariake Tennis n Mori; from there, it is a three-minute walk. 

The Limousine Bus Haneda Aiport Line will go to Ariake Garden; from there, it is a 10-minute walk. The Tokyo BRT bus for the International Exhibition Centre will also go to Ariake Tennis no Mori; it is a three-minute walk from there.

Access by Tokyo Water Bus

One of the most interesting ways of getting to Small Worlds Tokyo is by the Tokyo Water Bus. 

Asakusa Water Bus
  • Easily purchase your Asakusa Water Bus tickets at a discounted price

The Water Bus goes from Asakusa Pier to Odaiba Pier and offers visitors a stunning view of Tokyo Bay. From Odaiba Pier, it is a 25-minute walk to Small Worlds. 

The Water Bus journey offered by Tokyo Cruise could be a more relaxing and comfortable way of travelling to Odaiba while turning the trip into part of the experience. 

The Water Bus takes 70 minutes from Asakusa Pier to Odaiba Pier, costing 1720 yen (US$ 11.51) for an adult and 860 yen (US$ 5.75) for a child ticket.

Tokyo Water Bus - Queen Emeraldas
Tokyo Water Bus – Queen Emeraldas

Attractions and Experiences at Small Worlds Tokyo

Small Worlds Tokyo offers various areas that should suit different types of visitors, including anime lovers, plane enthusiasts, and Japanese culture and history fans. 

There are also some unique experiences here that will create amazing memories, and you could go home with a unique souvenir.

Space Center

The Space Center was the first area I saw at Small Worlds, and I was immediately blown away by the attention to detail and the use of technology. 

A rocket launch occurs every 30 minutes, and I arrived right before this happened. I was shocked by how great and realistic they made this look with a miniature model of a rocket plus some smoke with lighting effects. If you miss the rocket launch, there are screens displaying the launch times so you can always catch the next one.

Launch times
Launch times

The Space Center mixes the 1960s Apollo Program with future space travel and space centre ideas. In the 1960s area, you can spend hours looking for every hidden detail as miniature people are camping out to watch the Saturn V launch. You can see various people across this area preparing for the rocket launch in different ways.

I also spotted a few familiar faces in this area, including a recreation of a scene from Back to The Future, and I saw the A-Team van and possibly Optimus Prime. The futuristic Space Center area looks like something out of Star Trek or Alien, and I particularly liked the look and feel of this area with the design and LED lights.

Great Scot! You can spot some familiar characters at Small Worlds Tokyo.
Great Scot! You can spot some familiar characters at Small Worlds Tokyo.

Global Village

The most diverse area of Small Worlds Tokyo is the Global Village. This area transports visitors to five countries across Europe and Asia and blends realism with fantasy elements.

Set during the 1900s of the Industrial Revolution era, there is a steampunk vibe with the architecture of the miniature buildings, as well as with some of the vehicles such as hot air balloons. 

If you look closely enough, you can spot regular people going about their daily lives, working in villages and coal mines in a European town. But if you look at the grassy hills, you can find mythical creatures like dragons and pegasus horses.

European town at Small Worlds Tokyo
European town at Small Worlds Tokyo

The Asian part of Global Village is a real treat for the eyes. One of the areas looks like a floating market in Thailand with loads of floating boats. Merchants can be found selling all types of unique items which are fun to spot. 

For me, the best part of Global Village was the Hong Kong/China Town Area. The detail on the busy streets with neon lights, billboards, and Chinese archways is spectacular. This section is a really fun area to take photos.

Chinatown Area
Chinatown Area

Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon

The Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon is one of the areas that anime fans will love. As someone who doesn’t know much about Sailor Moon, I was surprised with how much I enjoyed this section.

This area features a miniature version of the trendy Azabu-Juban district of Tokyo, which was used as the setting for Sailor Moon. This diorama features an accurate version of the town’s many high buildings and some beautiful temples and shrines on display. It really feels like Tokyo. This area also looks wonderful when it changes from day to night, and the city lights begin to glitter. 

For the fans of Sailor Moon, you can have fun trying to spot the characters in various parts of the town. Even as someone who isn’t a fan, I managed to find some of the main stars. 

Masked Ball at Embassy of D Kingdom
Masked Ball at Embassy of D Kingdom

Crystal Tokyo

The Crystal Tokyo display is in the same area as Sailor Moon. Crystal Tokyo is the capital of the 30th century in the Sailor Moon series. This display is a city created by many stunning crystal buildings.

When the day changes to night, Crystal Tokyo looks most impressive. The diorama uses light effects to make the city shine beautifully, while the screen behind shows a massive full moon. There was also music playing while this happened, which set the tone and mood of this area.

Crystal Tokyo
Crystal Tokyo

Evangelion Hanger

As an Evangelion fan, this was one of my most anticipated areas. The Evangelion Hanger is a replica of the hanger area that hosts the Evangelion units. As I entered this area, I felt like I had just walked straight into the anime.

The Evangelion hanger is an impressive huge diorama featuring the launch base for the Evangelion and replicas of Unit-00, Unit-01, and Unit-02. These Evangelion Units stand at an impressive 60 cm and tower above all of the miniature people. 

During a process that takes about 20 minutes, all of the Evangelion Units, one by one, are sent to the back of the room. Then, they are launched through the roof of the diorama, where, in the anime, they would be going into combat. 

During this process, you can hear orders from the NERV command centre and music playing from the anime, making the whole process very exciting and atmospheric. 

Evangelion Unit 01 with workers standing below.
Evangelion Unit 01 with workers standing below.

Evangelion Tokyo-III

Evangelion Tokyo-III is based on the fictional version of Tokyo from the Evangelion anime. There are two parts to this area. 

You can see the bustling part of town, home to residents living their lives. There are bus stations, houses, restaurants, bridges, and a school. This area is very detailed and includes many of the anime’s main characters living amongst regular people. I spent a long time trying to spot Shinji and the gang. While standing in this area, Tokyo-III is one level below, allowing visitors to overlook it. 

At set times, the world changes from day to night. The city lights come on, and on the background screen, the sun sets, and the area resembles a night cityscape. Then, just like in the anime, the city becomes a fortress when there is the threat of a monster attack. The ground starts to open, and the buildings lower underneath and hide for protection. This was impressive to see for anime and non-anime fans alike. 

Kansai International Airport

For me, the Kansai International Airport was the most surprising area of Small Worlds Tokyo. This area also highlights the creativity of the team of artists and designers.

Like some other sections, Kansai International Airport features two main areas. The runways and the airport’s terminal buildings are accurately recreated. 

There are replica aeroplanes on the runaways with different airline logos decorating them. And every so often, these planes take off from the runaways. Complete with sound design of engines roaring, you can watch the planes take off and disappear through a hole in the wall. 

Runways at Kansai International Airport
Runways at Kansai International Airport

Every ten minutes, the airport slowly changes to evening mode, with the guidelights lighting up the runway and the projection screen backdrops changing to stunning night views. 

There are also dioramas of an airport featuring check-in counters, departure gates, restaurants, and an arrival gate. Look out for cute moments captured between the miniature people as they meet in the airport.

Overlooking the airport runaway area is a lifesize airport lounge modelled after the lounge at Kansai International Airport. 

This area is great for visitors who want a little break. There are plenty of seats which you can relax on. There are vending machines which you can use to buy a drink. And if you sit at the front, you can watch the runaways and see the planes taking off. 

There are also announcements played in this area reporting which planes are taking off and at which time. Sitting in the area for a while and having a drink, I felt like I was actually in an airport. 

The lounge at Kansai International Airport.
The lounge at Kansai International Airport.

Nightlife in Japan

There is a cafe on the second floor, which also features the stunning Nightlife in Japan area. 

This area features night views of various regions of Japan, which visitors can enjoy while having a break in the cafe or enjoying one of their meals. This area also has an illuminated ceiling with hundreds of hanging lights and documentaries about Small Worlds Tokyo playing on a large projection screen.

The diorama is the centrepiece of the cafe and features familiar timeless Japanese landscapes, including a castle, fishing villages, rice paddies, and factory areas. 

Japan is famous for being proud of having four vastly different seasons. This diorama covers them all with areas featuring cherry blossoms and another featuring autumn leaves. This display also features another hole in the middle, allowing you to poke your head out of and offer close, unrestricted views or even create great photo ops.

3D Figure Making

Small Worlds Tokyo features a 3D Figure Making service. A state-of-the-art 3D scanner allows visitors to create a 1/80, 1/35, or 1/24 scale figure of themselves. 

The scale figure is a unique souvenir to take home with you, or you can pay for a one-year plan, and your figure will become a resident of a Small Worlds area. 

These figures can be created either alone, in pairs, or as a family. On the 11th and 22nd of every month, Small Worlds hosts Pet Day. On this day, you can create a model figure of yourself and your pet.

If you plan on creating your own figure, Small Worlds Tokyo has some recommendations for clothing. They advise against wearing anything with a shiny appearance. Dark clothing might result in an unrefined shape during 3D conversion. 

Visitors can bring a prop with them, but they must be under the size of a 500ml plastic bottle. Thin props such as paper or boards might not retain their colour and could look transparent as a figure.

Price for 3D Figure Making (Excluding Resident Fees):

  • Figure 1/80 scale: 2,000 yen (US$ 13.19). Additional figure of the same type: 1,500 yen (US$ 9.90)
  • Figure 1/35 scale: 3,500yen (US$ 23.09). Additional figure of the same type: 2,500 yen (US$ 16.49)
  • Figure 1/24 scale: 8,000 yen (US$ 52.78). Additional figure of the same type: 7,000 yen (US$ 46.19)
  • Couple 1/80 scale: 3,000 yen (US$ 19.80). Additional figure of the same type: 2,500 yen (US$ 16.50)
  • Couple 1/35 scale: 4,500 yen (US$ 29.69). Additional figure of the same type: 3,500 yen (US$ 23.10)
  • Couple 1/24 scale: 12,000 yen (US$ 79.18). Additional figure of the same type: 11,000 yen (US$ 72.59)
  • Group 1/80 scale: 4,000 yen (US$ 26.40). Additional figure of the same type: 3,500 yen (US$ 23.10)
  • Group 1/35 scale: 6,000 yen (US$ 39.59). Additional figure of the same type: 5,000 yen (US$ 33.00)
  • Group 1/24 scale: 15,000 yen (US$ 98.99). Additional figure of the same type: 14,000 yen (US$ 92.39)

The resident figures must be on the 1/80 scale. Resident Rights Plans have various prices depending on the area and whether they include the annual pass plan.

  • Evangelion Area With Annual Pass: Adult: 19,800 Yen (US$ 130.67). Teen and Under: 17,600 Yen (US$ 116.15)
  • Evangelion Area Without Annual Pass: Adult/Teen and Under: 9,800 Yen (US$ 64.68)
  • Space Center/Global Village/Kansai International Airport With Annual Pass: Adult: 12,630 Yen (US$ 83.35). Teen and Under: 10,760 Yen (US$ 71.01)
  • Space Center/Global Village/Kansai International Airport Without Annual Pass: Adult/Teen and Under: 4,800 Yen (US$ 31.68)
  • Couples Ticket – Space Center/Global Village/Kansai International Airport Without Annual Pass: Set Price for 2 People: 7,000 Yen (US$ 46.20)

The figure production will be finished one month after the 3D scanning. You can then pick up the figure at the Small Worlds counter or have it delivered.

Shipping Service

  • Shipment within Japan (by Yamato Transport): 650 yen per parcel (US$ 4.29)
  • International Shipping (by DHL): To Asia: 4,200-4,600 yen (US$ 27.70-30.34). To Americas: 5,900 yen (US$ 38.91). To Europe: 5,500-8,250 yen (US$ 36.28-54.51)

An Express plan allows visitors to pick up their figures much more quickly. These numbers are very limited, so customers will have to act quickly.

The Express Plan allows visitors to be scanned before 1 pm and pick up their figure the next day after 2 pm. This is limited to the first five people and costs an extra 2000 yen (US$ 13.20).

The Fast Plan allows visitors to be scanned before 4 pm. The figure will then be ready to collect after 2 pm three days later. This Fast Plan is limited to the first eight people daily and costs an extra 1500 yen (US$ 9.90).

Workshops

Various workshops are run at Small Worlds Tokyo, which can be fun. They also add special events for specific dates. If you are interested in the workshops, check the official website before choosing which day to visit. 

All the workshops run weekdays from 11 pm to 5 pm and on weekends from 10 am to 5 pm.

Frog Colouring Experience: 1,000 yen (US$ 6.70)

This workshop allows visitors to paint a small boot that has a frog popping out of it. It fits in the palm of your hand. This workshop takes between 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Making Rabbit, Rocket and Motorcycle Keyrings: 1,000 yen (US$ 6.70)

Visitors can paint a small keychain at this workshop. The keyring workshop takes between 15 to 30 minutes. 

Make Your Own Yurishito: 1,000 yen (US$ 6.70)

Yurishito is the Evangelion mascot. In this workshop, you can create your own and paint it however you want. The Yurishito workshop takes between 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Making a Mini Diorama of Mt Fuji: 1,500 yen (US$ 9.90)

In this workshop, visitors can make and paint their own unique MT Fuji Diorama. This Mt Fuji workshop takes 1 hour. Places are limited for this workshop, and sometimes it runs out of stock.

Special Events

Small Worlds Tokyo runs Pet Day on the 11th and 22nd of every month. On these days, you can bring your pet with you and explore Small Worlds together (Excluding Floor 2). You can also have a 3D Figure created with your pet.

On the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month, Small Worlds runs Go! Wheel Day. During these days, people in wheelchairs and strollers are encouraged to visit. 

Some areas are challenging to enter or see in a wheelchair, but on Go! Wheel Day, these areas are open for visitors. Curtains in the Evangelion area will be opened, and the rise of Tokyo-III will be visible. Part of the ‘Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon’ area will also be open for visitors.

Food and Drink Options at Small Worlds Tokyo

For visitors looking for something to eat at Small Worlds Tokyo, the Museum Cafe is on the 2nd floor. 

The cafe serves various photogenic meals and sweet treats you can enjoy. While you have your food, there is a diorama on display that is themed on Japanese nights and scenery.

There are some Japanese dishes available, such as curry and omurice. For other cuisines, there is a Neapolitan pasta dish or a special pork hotdog. 

Some of the stand-out desserts are the matcha parfait and a Mont Blanc. For visitors just wanting a drink, a range of soft drinks and hot drinks like coffee and oolong tea are available. There are also some alcoholic beverages available, including beer, wine, and highballs. 

The Museum Cafe will be closed 30 minutes before Small Worlds. Staff will take the last orders one hour before closing time.

The Museum Cafe.
The Museum Cafe.

Shopping and Souvenirs

Small Worlds Tokyo has a very extensive gift shop with lots of exclusive merchandise, including small dioramas, Small World souvenirs and a bunch of Evangelion and Sailor Moon merchandise.

A large Evangelion section features souvenirs, including mugs, t-shirts, illumination bottles, toys, fans, and even boxer shorts. For Evangelion fans, this gift shop has plenty to offer.

The Sailor Moon section is smaller, but some great items remain to purchase. There are gorgeous charms, Japanese-style decorative masking tape, cookies and tote bags.

For the non-anime fans, there are still plenty of souvenir options available. Some of the must-buy items include an official location guidebook, stainless steel bottle flasks, miniature DIY dioramas, and cardboard puzzle models of famous Japanese landmarks.

DIY Miniature house models are one of the popular items at the gift shop.
DIY Miniature house models are one of the popular items at the gift shop.

Tips and Tricks for a Great Experience

Before you make the trip to Small Worlds Tokyo, there are some things you should consider to make the very best of this experience. 

Best Time to Visit

Go on a weekday if possible. I visited on a Friday morning, and it was relatively quiet. The quietness allowed me to take my time exploring, and I had plenty of space for taking photos without anybody getting in my way. 

During some events, such as the rocket launch, those areas can become busier than usual. Visitors should check the time of the launches when they arrive and plan to be there early if they want the best view. 

How Long to Spend at Small Worlds

I spent almost 3 hours walking around Small Worlds and taking in all the details, so be sure to leave plenty of time free. 

Also, remember that most areas change from day to night and look completely different. It is worth staying in each area and waiting for the change, especially if you want to take photos.

Indoor Venue

Small Worlds Tokyo is indoors, so you don’t have to dress for the elements. If you bring an umbrella, there are umbrella locks at the entrance. This area also has coin lockers if you want to leave a backpack or shopping bag there. 

Amenities and Facilities

There are no ATMs on site, so make sure you bring some cash with you. If you need refreshments, there is a cafe on the 2nd floor. There is a drink vending machine on the 3rd floor at the Kansai International Airport area.

Photography

Photography is allowed at Small Worlds Tokyo, so bring your camera. However, certain photography equipment, including reflector boards, softboxes, tripods, selfie sticks, and drones, are prohibited.

What Not to Bring, and What You Can Bring

Other items that are forbidden are sharp objects, explosives, radio control vehicles, alcohol, and food and drinks. However, you can take candies, gum, snacks for children, water bottles and plastic bottles into Small Worlds. 

Pets

Pets can only be brought on the 11th and 22nd of every month. However, service dogs are always allowed. 

Accessibility

Small Worlds Tokyo is made accessible for people in wheelchairs or strollers. There are ramps and elevators to make it easier to move around between levels and floors. There are multipurpose toilets on the 2nd and 3rd floors for disabled visitors. And the bathroom on the 3rd floor is ostomate friendly.

Two wheelchairs are available for rental. Please ask about this at the ticket counter. Small Worlds Tokyo also has a disabled parking area that can accommodate three cars, however, they don’t accept reservations. There are also nursing rooms on the 2nd and 3rd floor, which have changing tables. These rooms also contain water dispensers with hot and cold water available.

Nearby Attractions

If you travel to Odaiba for Small Worlds Tokyo, you should pair it with another attraction in the area. 

A short 10-minute walk from Small Worlds is the Tokyo Water Science Museum. This is a kid’s museum with interactive exhibits and tours of the Ariake pumping station to explore water science. The Water Science Museum is free to enter and aimed at children.

If you feel like walking a little more, Tokyo Joypolis is a 20-minute walk. This indoor amusement park is full of rides, attractions, and games. Joypolis has something for everyone, from children to adults. 

Tokyo Joypolis is only a 20-minute walk from Small Worlds.
Tokyo Joypolis is only a 20-minute walk from Small Worlds.

Next to Joypolis is the famous Unko Poop Museum. This is an entertainment museum dedicated to the idea of cute poop and is definitely a quirky Japanese experience.

Another popular attraction nearby is Team Labs Planets, a 25-minute walk from Small Worlds Tokyo. Team Labs Planets is brilliant for photographers and would be great to pair with Small Worlds. If you are visiting, please book this in advance to avoid disappointment.

Final Thoughts on Small Worlds Tokyo

If you enjoy models, miniatures or dioramas, you will love Small Worlds Tokyo. 

Before visiting Small Worlds, I had no real interest in miniatures but was captivated by the attention to detail and the technology used throughout. I also didn’t realise that I would spend three hours there as I was looking for all the secrets and hidden characters.

If you are a fan of Evangelion, you will love the Evangelion areas. This section was my favourite part and probably the area where I spent the most time. The Evangelion section was also when I realised how much detail they used and how accurate the creations were. Sailor Moon fans will have a similar experience, too.

There are some fantastic places to take photos, and I saw people getting creative by using the holes in the dioramas you can pop your head out of. I never did this because I had my backpack, and it looked awkward. But for the best photos, this could be a good idea. If you have a zoom lens, I would also bring this, as some displays are harder to get close to.

The Small Worlds Tokyo ticket was definitely worth the admission price because it is a unique experience, and I spent a long time there. However, I wasn’t prepared to pay the extra fee for the 3D figure and the residency plan. If you are a big fan of models and miniatures, though, this is something that would interest you.

The Evangelion Tokyo III night view.
The Evangelion Tokyo III night view.
Small Worlds Tokyo
  • Easily purchase your Small Worlds Tokyo ticket at a discounted price through your preferred online travel agency
  • Choose the Klook Tokyo Pass to bundle your Tokyo tickets and get a great discount

Frequently Asked Questions about Small Worlds Tokyo?

If you have decided to book a ticket for Small Worlds Tokyo, you might have some last-minute questions or concerns before you go.

Small Worlds Tokyo - Pinterest Image
Small Worlds Tokyo – Pinterest Image

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